Why Subrogation Provides Relief, But Not Remedy…..

   Judge Anna von Reitz

Most of the ills of the court scenarios we experience can be relieved simply by stepping forward at the appropriate moment and saying, “Ahem…. I am here via Special Limited Visitation. This is my legal and lawful Notice on and for the record of the court that I am owed the legal and lawful right of subrogation in this case. The bond being brought forward by the Prosecutor has been issued in my name and my credit underwrites it, making me the actual creditor owed exoneration of my Good Name and Estate. I ask the Prosecutor to certify my subrogation and ask the court to honor my Notice of Set-Off, to settle the account, and eliminate the record.”

This is basically a substitution in which the actual Creditor of the ESTATE or whatever other entity is being “charged” —replaces the Prosecutor.

They won’t want to give up this position and will try to distract you or get you to enter into arguments with them. Don’t fall for it. Just stand there four-square on the floor and if necessary, repeat a dozen times, “Your Honor, I am here to claim my right of subrogation and have raised a bar to all further proceedings.”

The substitution of Plaintiffs, aka, subrogation, puts an end to the claim and the role of the Prosecutor, too, which is a relief. This is often “good enough” for the purposes of the people involved, because it stops an unjust prosecution.

However, it fails as remedy, because it does not serve to prevent such prosecutions, does not punish the perpetrators (other then depriving them of their sought-after unjust enrichment), does not provide monetary or other satisfaction for inconvenience, impounds, improper detainment and other travesties that often accompany these attacks.

So, use subrogation in cases where there is no actual physical harm to anyone, to stop the prosecution in its tracks. If that’s all you want to do, call it good.

_________________________________________________________

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.